Duties of Dental Assistants

Dental Assistants are very versatile. They are well trained in a variety of areas to properly assist Dentists and Hygienists perform quality dental work on all individuals. The duties will depend on the state regulations, the type of dental facility, and how that particular facility has their operations set up. Often the smaller the dental facility, the more types of duties the Dental Assistant will be trained in.

Typical Dental Assistant tasks include sterilizing instruments and setting up instrument trays. The proper cleansing and sterilizing of dental instruments is a detrimental part of providing quality service to all patients. Instrument trays are set up with the proper tools and equipment that can possibly be needed for a particular dental procedure. Dental Assistants get these materials together and in the area where the procedure will take place. This helps things run smoothly and allows the Dentist or Hygienist to remain focused on the procedure. It eliminates searching for each item as it is needed.

Dental Assistants often remain with the dentist or Hygienist during the procedures. They are responsible for suction and for handing the instruments to the other staff throughout the procedures. They are also there to offer instant assistance if an emergency arises during the procedure. In some dental facilities, the Dental Assistant will monitor the vital signs of all patients as well as administer local anesthetics.

Dental Assistants often help to make patients feel comfortable before, during, and after their procedures. They can offer a king word, help adjust lighting and chair position, and provide the patient with follow up information to care for their procedures. Dental Assistants are often asked to make phone calls and follow up on the recovery process for some patients after major procedures including root canals, bridges, and extractions.

It is common for Dental Assistants to perform X-rays and other lab procedures including castings for caps and bridges. They often talk to patients about their medical history and any types of communicable diseases. They discuss proper care after procedures to ensure patients do all they can to allow their procedures to heal properly. They may even call in prescriptions as a courtesy to patients.

Dental Assistants are trained in emergency procedures. While it is unlikely anything will go wrong in the dental office, occasionally it does. Some individuals suffer from an allergic reaction to the anesthetic and require medical attention. Others may swallow something and choke during a procedure. Other times a patient may stop breathing. Knowing CPR and properly monitoring vital signs are all valuable in a crisis situation in the medical facility.

As you can see, Dental Assistants are often trained in a wide variety of processes and procedures. This will help ensure they keep busy as well as add variety to their daily routine in the workplace. Dental Assistants must learn quickly as well as pay attention to details. Their role is very important to the overall functioning of the entire dental facility.

The duties of a Dental Assistant are constantly changing depending on the needs of the patients and changes in technology. It is important that Dental Assistants keep up on such changes. Often, their employer will require them to attend trainings, workshops, and seminars to keep up with all the changes and brush up in any areas necessary to provide the best possible services.

Support for Dental Assistants

Dental Assistants can find themselves easily overwhelmed with the level of responsibility they have and the many duties of their job. Since they work hard to meet all of these requirements, it is no wonder they can find themselves stressed out and needing someone to talk to. It is always easier to talk to those who know exactly what you are talking about. The medical and dental professions are known for taking enthusiastic qualified individuals and squeezing the very life out of them will took much be asked of them on a daily basis.

Dental Assistant support groups are not meant to be an arena to negativity to breed and escalate. It is to provide Dental Assistants with social interactions with others in the field who are experiencing the same types of things in their employment endeavors as well. Too often, individuals in the dental field are their own worst enemy. They demand too much of themselves. Being part of a Dental Assistant support group will help you set realistic goals and expectations for yourself.

Dental Assistant support groups can be formed of your co-workers if you work in a fairly large dental facility. If not, consider advertising for Dental Assistants from other facilities to get together and form a group. This can offer valuable insight as to how other organizations deal with issues that you are experiencing in your role as a Dental Assistant. Most dental facilities will support your endeavors as they understand the restraints of the Dental Assistant field. You may also want to open the group up to those interested in pursing a career as a Dental Assistant, those in a Dental Assistant program, and those who have retired from a career as a Dental Assistant. Each can offer unique perspectives on the dental field of being a Dental Assistant.

Often, each dental facility can take a turn hosting the meeting. Another option is to get a
Church or library to allow you to meet in their facility free of charge. You can host meetings once a week, every other week, or monthly depending on how in depth you want your support group to be.

Another great option is to join a support group online. You can stay anonymous, as well as interact from the comfort of your home. Most online support groups for Dental Assistants are free of charge and hosted by dental organizations. They offer tips, advice, online magazines, chat rooms, and message boards. All available at your fingertips with the touch of a few simple keys. These are an excellent source of support for those not wanting to put effort and time into organizing a Dental Assistant support group.

A career as a Dental Assistant can proof to be challenging. To avoid burnout and the effects of stress, consider joining a Dental Assistant support group. It can be a wonderful opportunity to meet new people in the field, gain information, share your experiences, and just get some needed support from those who know best what your experiences are on a daily basis in your role as a Dental Assistant.

Support groups are known to offer social interactions, stress relief, and friendships. Having a support group for Dental Assistants is no different. To make sure your support group is effective, set some ground rules. The support group is to stay positive. It is available to discuss problems, but not just as a complaint mechanism. The goal needs to be to offer support and solutions to the issues Dental Assistants are experiencing. You will also want to keep your meetings set on a regular day and time. An agenda will also prove to be useful as is a newsletter. Just make sure to get plenty of help with organizing the details or the support group can overwhelm you. Ironically, that will result in your career as a Dental Assistant proving to be even more stressful for you!